Inserting my own peripheral IV catheter.

I guess I should say: Warning: Graphic medical procedure!

When I was learning to insert an IV, I couldn’t find many decent tutorials online (I was only allowed one nurse visit to walk me through it and I found watching people do it was even more informative). Since my Mom is visiting, I asked her to make a video in case it could be helpful for others. This angle isn’t the best for a detailed view, but it’s a good first go.


Best Endocrinologist Ever.

Every time I have an appointment with my endocrinologist, I hem and haw about whether I should cancel it. It’s on the other side of town, $50 round-trip in an Uber, it only ever lasts about 20 minutes and couldn’t she just look at my thyroid lab results and email me about whether to stick with my current hormone dosages? Well, each time I go, I am so grateful for this doctor (last week I told her nurse I would walk on hot coals for Dr. B) and I vow to come straight home and write an update so I can remember everything she said. I never have managed to do this and the visit summaries hardly mention anything at all, so today I’m going to write a general update of her treatment.

I’ve seen a lot of endocrinologists in the last six years and they have all, without exception, been kind of odd, stoic and monosyllabic. Until Dr. B. She’s vibrant and engaged (after seeing her, I always mourn my lack of brain energy a little more), listens closely, talks about her ideas out loud, thinks outside of the box and is interested in conditions not typically related to the endocrine system. Imagine that: a big hospital allopathic endocrinologist taking the whole body into account!

The first time I saw her a year ago, I told her my basic story (anaphylaxis 2001-2002, vasovagal collapse 2005-2011, thyroid goiters 2009, radioiodine ablation 2010, SICK 2011), assuming she’d check my thyroid and update my prescription as per usual — and she did, but she also ordered pituitary blood tests, a Cortrosyn stimulation test (CST) (otherwise known as an ACTH stimulation test — it measures how well the adrenal glands respond to ACTH), referred me to two neurologists — one that specialises in headaches and one that specialises in dysautonomia — and said we would consider placing a continuous glucose monitoring device to assess the drops in my blood sugar (good news is, my blood sugar crashes got much better, possibly because I am eating all foods again and have put on weight). No other endocrinologist had ever suggested any of these things.

I was dreading the CST because of my reactivity and intravenous injections of anything don’t allow me to start low and slow, but it was fine. I did my research beforehand (yes, they were they only using 1mcg of Cortrosyn; no, I didn’t need to fast; no, it didn’t need to be timed according to the follicular phase of my menstrual cycle; no, I didn’t need to be off bioidentical hormones; and, yes, my husband could be with me), so I felt comfortable about the procedure and the results were normal.

The pituitary testing showed low LH (luteinizing hormone), DHEA and IGF-1. Because of the latter, at our next appointment Dr. B ordered a pituitary MRI to “leave no stone unturned” (LOVE her). The MRI was normal, but she emphasised that it was less reliable because of my unwillingness to use contrast (I didn’t think the risks of a reaction outweighed the benefits of a better MRI — and she was ok with that). She also gave me a prescription for Florinef to see if it would help with my hypotension (blood pressure was 80/60 at this appointment). I trialed it for a month (starting at 0.0125mg (!!), working up to 0.1mg) and thought it might be increasing my headaches (but not my blood pressure, of course), so I stopped, but it’s still on my list to retry.

My thyroid levels have consistently been tanked for the last 6 years and at every appointment Dr. B would tweak my meds. I’ve gone from 50mcg/day of levothyroxine to 100 to 125 and from 5mcg/liothyronine to 10 and — this is exciting — when I told her my naturopath suggested much higher T3 and lower T4, Dr. B said, “I’m totally open to that, let’s try it.” 😮 Typically allopathic endocrinologists and NDs do not see eye to eye on treatment and optimal thyroid levels and often one doctor will be resistant to another doctor’s suggestions, especially when the suggestion comes from someone who isn’t a specialist. Dr. B has no ego getting in the way. So, we increased my T3 to 15mcg twice/day and lowered T4 to 100mcg. I really don’t know if it has helped, but she seems more satisfied with my thyroid levels. She told me to watch out for tremors, heart palpitations and insomnia, but they are all within my normal constellation of symptoms, so who knows (although, as I’m typing this, I realise that my quite-vicious nightly palpitations haven’t happened in a while– maybe weeks). She diagnosed me with “euthyroid sick syndrome” which essentially means your thyroid will stay sick until the underlying chronic illness gets better.

I saw a headache neurologist and a dysautonomia specialist (more on both of those in separate posts), but neither of them were the ones to which Dr. B referred me. And — another reason to love her — she had no problem with that and was still interested in what they had to say. Even better, when I told her the dysautonomia specialist didn’t have much to offer and essentially told me just to make sure I don’t decondition any further, Dr. B raised her eyebrows in surprise and kind of dismissed this, still interested in helping me fix this piece of the puzzle (those of you that haven’t done the doctor rounds might not realise that almost all of them tell you to simply exercise more (or gain/lose weight) (or take antidepressants), so I expected Dr. B to take the specialist’s assessment as bible and agree that I was just deconditioned). She suggested I do a growth hormone challenge (it involves a 17-hour fast, an 8am check-in and a 5-hour test where they give intravenous glucagon and then measure human growth hormone (HGH) response through blood draws) and said the worst side effect she’d seen was vomiting. I wanted to vomit at the thought of getting to a hospital at 8 in the morning. I went home to do some research; that was in July of last year.

When I saw her again at the end of September, I hadn’t done the HGH challenge and she didn’t give me a hard time at all. Three months after that appointment I still hadn’t found the nerve, so I emailed her a long message about my glucagon fears (those of you with mast cell/anaphylaxis/medication sensitivity issues can read my email* below for the reasons it gave me pause) which any other specialist would either not answer or reply that I should come in for an appointment to discuss. Instead, she sent me a very thoughtful, validating reply (not “For fuck sake, stop being such a scaredy-cat and do the bloody test since I’m the one doctor who is investigating all these things!”) and offered an alternative to glucagon — an insulin challenge test — which I agreed to … and then never did. They give you intravenous insulin, drop your blood sugar to 40 and then test HGH. I told her I was more comfortable with the devil I knew (hypoglycemia) then the one I didn’t. But, it turns out I’m not really comfortable with voluntarily meeting any devil. I’ve had my blood sugar drop into the 40s. It was absolutely horrific — one of the worst feelings I’ve ever felt. And, although they give you intravenous glucose right afterwards, I still couldn’t bring myself to do this test and subject myself to the crash when I thought they probably wouldn’t find anything.

So, I waited until my appointment this month — 8 months after she first wanted to investigate this avenue — and told her of my fears about the insulin challenge test as well. I expected her to just give up, to say there’s probably nothing wrong there, anyway, but she didn’t. She said there was an additional reason to do the insulin challenge (other than for HGH output) and that was that it can pick up a hypothalamus issue that the glucagon stimulation test can’t. Ok, I can get on board since it’s a two-fer. However, in another display of out-of-the-box-ness and medical generosity, she suggested I just try HGH injections without doing the challenge test. She said she had two other patients with the dyautonomia-mast cell-EDS trifecta (more on my EDS diagnosis at another time) and, even though neither one flunked the stimulation test, they tried HGH and had really good results. A friend of my sister-in-law’s had a lot of success with HGH and it has always been in the back of my head as something to try when I win the lotto. I read it cost thousands of dollars, but Dr. B’s prescription is “only” $138/month, so I’m on board. If/when I get the nerve, I can stop the HGH for a week and do the challenge test and, if I fail, insurance will pay for my prescription. An added bonus is my nurse who comes to my home every week (to give me intravenous fluids with my immunoglobulin infusions) can show me how to subcutaneously inject the HGH and I don’t need to go across town for a tutorial appointment.

Gratitude for good doctors! Wish me luck with the HGH.

IV Saline Experiment


My doctor finally acquiesced to my pleas to try IV saline and see if it helped my symptoms at all. I really wanted to try it last month when I was going through such hell after the tilt table test (I still cannot believe how profound the payback was from what felt like a comparatively benign day of tests), but she wasn’t convinced it was a worthy experiment. It wasn’t until I sent her POTSgrrl’s post (thank you!), that she thought we could give it a try.

I scheduled the appointment for the day my period was due because that is typically when I am most incapacitated by ME symptoms. It was 6 hours from the time we left the house until we returned. I never expected such a long day. We did 2 full bags of saline over a little less than 3 hours (and it took 3 tries to get the IV line in. Twice, the nurse said, “Shoot, I blew the vein.” I didn’t know what “blew the vein” meant and I was lying down and couldn’t see my arm, so I had a panic about what complications would happen, how much blood was everywhere and whether we should continue. Once something is underway ~ a treatment, a plane trip, anything ~ I don’t fret at all, but, during the time when I can change my mind, I always start to second-guess my decision. Maybe I shouldn’t have asked for saline. Everything always goes wrong. Maybe two “blown” veins is the universe telling me this is a bad idea. Maybe I should stop it now and go home. But the nurse went and got a different person to put in the IV and she was quick and confident and, once it was done, my mind was at ease).

The worst part about the treatment was how cold I was. The room was freezing and I spent 4 hours in there covered in blankets, my heated vest (it has a battery pack), my coat, my scarf and gloves, my husband’s coat, a water bottle that my husband filled with hot water from the tap… It was ridiculous.

Below is the email I sent my doctor this morning. I wanted to post it here so I have a record of how this treatment helped. Or didn’t.

Hi Dr. XXX,

My BP was 96/63 originally, somewhat the same after 1 bag of saline and, after 1.5 bags, it had actually gone down to 88/XX. After we were finished, it was back to the 9X/6X range again.

The good repercussions:

  • My heart rate has been so low. WOW! Morning HR on Saturday and Sunday was 53/54 bpm and, sitting watching tv, my HR was mid- to high-50s. That’s about 15 bpm lower than usual. Activities that would normally put my HR above 110 bpms (such as walking up 6 stairs and getting in bed) were only causing me to go into the 80s. The effect lasted all weekend.
  • My BP was higher than normal Friday night (109/67), but went back down the next day.
  • My period came Saturday morning and was definitely easier than it has been in the past few months. Cramps were minimal and I didn’t feel dizzy, however my muscles were still very sore and achy.
  • My energy was not bad over the weekend. I took 1400 steps Saturday and Sunday, which is a lot for me.
  • I was able to wash my cpap on Saturday and go out on my scooter for 45 mins on Sunday, both of which would normally be too much on the first two days of my period.

The bad repercussions:

  • The most prominent difference is, although my HR has been low, my heart feels like it is “tripping” every so often (maybe 4 or 5 times an hour). This is brand new. It feels like a pitter-patter palpitation, like it skips a beat or speeds up for a second… When this happened, my HR was still low.
  • It was a 6-hour total excursion, which, for me, is unheard of. This had to have repercussions.
  • I felt terrible Friday night. Heavy, inflamed, wiped out.
  • My eyes swelled up A LOT after the saline, as did my fingers, my sinuses and what felt like my lungs (my breathing felt laboured).
  • The spot in my throat under my jaw that itches when I am having an allergic reaction has been very itchy since Saturday morning (saline? period? something I ate?).
  • I slept poorly Friday and Saturday nights and woke up too early both days.
  • I woke up this morning (Monday) feeling HORRIFIC. Much worse than any day in the past week. Completely wiped out, in pain, barely able to get out of bed. Feels like the flu (throat, muscles, head), but of course it’s not. I don’t know if it’s payback from the appointment and the weekend or what, but, if there were benefits from the saline, it looks like they are gone now. HR is back to being in the 70s when I’m sitting.

Thank you so much for being willing to try this experiment! I really, REALLY appreciate having someone in my corner.

I’m going back to bed for the day now because I feel worse than I have in weeks. But I’ll leave you with some scenes from my scooter-walk with my husband and pups ~ now the thing that gives me the most joy in my life.

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DIETS Part I: gluten-free, allergy, autoimmune/anti-inflammatory, classic elimination, and low-histamine.

My mother told me recently that she only gave me soy milk for a long time as a child after my allergy testing showed I was allergic to half of the things on this planet. This is when I was 3. I’ve always known the story of the skin-prick tests done on my tiny 3-year old back. My mother was torn in pieces listening to her baby wail, so I’ve heard about it often. I knew the testing showed I was allergic to lettuce and rabbits and newspaper and so many other things it seemed like a joke. I thought we had always just ignored it to no consequence and that the first thing I ever stopped consuming was MSG sometime in the 90s. I kept swelling. One day, I awoke with my face blown up like a balloon: my eyes were slits, my lips made it difficult to speak, I could barely bend my fingers. This happened after eating frozen egg rolls in the wee hours, after a night at the pub, so I became really vigilant about avoiding MSG. Then, a few years later, I ate at a Thai restaurant with my sister. I never tempted fate with Asian food, but, god, I missed it! and the restaurant swore there was no MSG in their food. The next day, my face was swelled up, so I never tried that again. I still don’t know if the culprit is definitely MSG, but avoiding it, as well as all Asian food, stopped those acute episodes.

My next elimination was alcohol in 2002. It should have been difficult, but I thought it might be causing me to repeatedly go into anaphylactic shock, so I had no choice. When you’re worried about dying, you’ll give up anything.

I ate and drank anything I wanted for ten more years. And I ate a lot. Since I shed my college weight, I’ve always been around 7 stone (I haven’t switched to thinking of myself in pounds because I like the nice neatness of “7 stone”) and my husband would joke that I ate way more than he did (he’s 14 inches taller than I am). After thyroid ablation in 2009, I couldn’t eat as much as I used to – I didn’t diet, my body simply got full quicker and wasn’t hungry all the time anymore.

In 2012, while trying to cure what ails me, I stopped eating gluten. It never occurred to me that it would be permanent, but it seems it might be. It didn’t change how I felt one bit, but, after talking to numerous doctors and reading this book, it seems like it would behoove me to continue to avoid it – if not for ME, then for my (other) autoimmune conditions.

Soon after that, I had blood tests done that showed allergies to cod, tomato and egg. Giving up cod was no problem, tomatoes and eggs almost killed me. But, I thought, what if? So, I stuck with it and it’s now been a year and a half and, you guessed it, I felt no change.

When I started seeing the Good Doctor last year, she put me on a diet for autoimmune conditions which, she said, resembled most anti-inflammatory regimens. I stopped eating all grains but oats, all legumes, dairy and starchy veg. I cut down on sugar, I stopped eating processed foods, I stopped drinking sodas – even “healthy” stevia ones, even flavored fizzy water. I stopped chewing chewing gum, stopped eating lozenges with colourings. Although I missed all of these things, it was similar to anaphylaxis – I felt like I was (am) dying and would do anything to improve my situation, so the choice was easy. I stuck with this protocol for almost a year and… Felt no different.

This past August, my doctor switched me to a more “traditional” elimination diet. I was allowed to add back grains (except corn) and legumes (except peanuts) but stopped eating red meat, pork, processed meats, shellfish, soy, citrus, and most forms of sweetness: honey, maple syrup, agave nectar, and, obviously, sugar. This was only meant to last for three weeks before tackling challenges, but I took a turn for the worse with my symptoms and doing food challenges showed nothing definitive, so I’ve kept everything eliminated. Compounding this restriction was my low energy and my husband’s overwhelmedness with the changing shopping rules, so neither of us got out of the habits formed over the last year. I joyfully started eating rice again, but didn’t really explore other grains or legumes. Once you’ve been doing something for a long time, it seems a monumental effort to change.

When I saw the Good Doctor again at the beginning of this month, she wanted me to continue this elimination for three more weeks, while making a concerted effort to detoxify my liver because she is thinking of testing me for heavy metal toxicity and, if necessary, going through a chelation protocol. Specifically, what she told me to do was:

    • Cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, watercress)
    • Kale
    • Swiss Chard
    • Collard greens
    • Garlic, onions
    • Grapes
    • Berries
    • Green and black teas
    • Herbs and spices such as rosemary, basil, turmeric, cumin, poppy seeds, black pepper, and lots of cilantro!
  • Metagenics Ultraclear formula: drink one shake each day (she already has me taking their probiotics and I get a patient discount).
  • Supplements [I am very happy to be taking vitamins again. I stopped all supplements and vitamins 3 months ago and never intended to stay off of them for so long. I’m eager to add more (CoQ10, Acetyl-l-carnitine etc.), but she is making me take things slow.]:
    • Vitamin D
    • Vitamin B6 & B2
    • Biotin
    • Glutamine
    • Zinc
  • Green detox soup[I said yuck to this soup because I thought it sounded like a warm green smoothie and I thought I didn’t like fennel, but it turns out it is SO DELICIOUS and I like to have some every day.]

This soup is a gift to your liver to help it with its critical role in cleansing and filtering the blood. Sulfur-containing foods, such as onions and garlic, will keep your glutathione levels and antioxidant power high. Cruciferous vegetables are great for all your detox pathways, especially estrogen. Enjoy this soup for breakfast, as a snack or any time of the day. You can make a big batch and freeze it in small containers.

Makes 4-6 servings

1 tbsp extra virgin coconut oil or olive oil
1 small onion, diced
1 tsp minced ginger
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 celery stalk, chopped
3 cups chopped broccoli, florets and stems
1/2 head fennel, chopped
1 tsp salt
3 cups water
1/8 tsp freshly ground pepper

Heat the oil in a medium pot on medium high heat. Add the onion and ginger and cook until onion is translucent. Add the garlic, celery, broccoli, and fennel and a generous pinch of salt and continue to cook another 2 minutes. Add the water, remaining salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then cover, reduce the heat, and simmer for 20 minutes. Place the soup in a blender and blend until smooth and creamy. Adjust salt.

Now the fun part: I haven’t been eating the chard, onions, grapes and berries she instructed me to because I am experimenting with a low-histamine diet. I am always trying to link seemingly unrelated conditions from my past to what is happening to me now. Just like I thought (think) dysautonomia explained not only my symptoms now, but issues I had pre-ME like Raynaud’s and fainting, I started to seriously look into histamine intolerance (HI) and mast cell activation disorders (MCAD). The swelling, the idiopathic anaphylaxis (which happened more often than not during my period), the alcohol intolerance, the dysmenorrhea, the hypotension and syncope (which happened more often than not during my period)… All of this makes sense in the context of a histamine problem. I used to wrack my brain and research incessantly to try to figure out why I was going into anaphylaxis but they could find nothing to which I was allergic. Was it the alcohol? Was it my period? Was it garlic? Was it ibuprofen?

When the allergist explained autoimmune urticaria and angioedema to me, he said the rashes I got during anaphylaxis and the swelling I’ve always experienced were the same mechanism in the body, just in different dermal layers. He said they are caused by tissue permeability and leakage and any vasodilator, such as alcohol, will potentiate the problem.. To demonstrate the autoimmune process, he injected me with my own plasma and I had a reaction on my forearm similar to the histamine control. He said these episodes could be brought on by emotional turmoil or stress and there is nothing to be done but take antihistamines. I counted myself lucky because some people have horrible chronic urticaria (I really recommend the film, Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead).

The more I researched histamine issues, however, the more I realized that my allergist, like all doctors, is limited by what he doesn’t know and what science hasn’t discovered. I asked my GP, the Good Doctor and my new environmental doctor about testing for MCAD and every one of them said they don’t know how. It turns out there really aren’t good tests, but they didn’t know this ~ they didn’t know anything about it!

I am going to continue the info about my low-histamine diet experience in Part 2 of this diet post (as well as all the other crazy elimination diets I’ve been researching: ketogenic, alkaline, low-salicylate, migraine) because there is a lot of information. But I’m giving you homework, if you’re interested in this topic at all: Listen to Yasmina Ykelenstam’s (The Low Histamine Chef) interview with Dr. Janice Joneja. There are 2 parts, but the first part is the most important. Get comfy because it is 49 minutes long and have a paper and pen ready. I’m telling you, it’s worth it. Dr. Joneja is so clear and knowledgeable.

Until next time…

Award Season


While I was down and out for those few weeks, dealing with the world spinning out of control and increased pain and flu symptoms ~ and the sadness that comes along with it all ~ I was nominated for FOUR awards by my fellow bloggers. The stars aligned in those days to remind me that I have value and to keep fighting. I also had so many comments from all of you (to which I still haven’t replied ~ I’m on the cusp, gaining ground, but making mistakes with pacing and trying not to slip backwards). Please PLEASE know what it meant to me to read your hang-in-theres and stay-strongs and you-are-not-alones. I can’t even imagine the level of loneliness and isolation some of you experienced having this disease before the internet. You are warriors!

Instead of nominating 35 other blogs (the total for all 4 awards), I am going to make this easy on myself and just tell you about 10 blogs that I think you should follow because they are wonderful. Some of them may be written by severely ill people and I wouldn’t expect them to respond. I realise this may be dousing the exponential process that is at the heart of these awards, but I think this is the most sincere way for me to respond without expending too much precious energy. All the bloggers I follow are chronically ill and I like the idea of saying, “Your writing is so amazing, I want everyone to read it. Pay it forward only if you have the energy and want to.”

So, with no further ado, here are my 10 nominees for the Elizabeth Milo Says You Should Subscribe To These Blogs award (especially if you have ME/CFS and/or dysautonomia):

It was hard not to repeat some of the blogs I nominated a year ago and I wanted to especially mention Dreams at Stake, Emotional Umbrella and No Poster Girl ~ these are three ladies that I would love to sit with around a dinner table and talk into the wee hours.

I want to thank Jess at My Journey Thru ME and Marie at CurranKentucky for nominating me for the Liebster Award and for the kind words they said about my blog on their posts ~ I’m very flattered!

Jess lives in London with her husband (boyfriend?) and had to leave her job as a solicitor after coming down with ME almost 3 years ago. Her blog is inspiring, informative and upbeat. She is currently experiencing a bit of energy revival and I can’t wait to see what the future holds for her.

Marie lives with her husband in Galway, Ireland (one of my favourite places on the planet). ME came into her life about a year and a half ago and, although she used to work, travel, train horses, and run marathons, she has kept a patient, yet fighting spirit through her illness. She also found poetry, which she writes in almost every post ~ one of the many reasons to follow her blog.

Donna at yadadarcyyada nominated me for the Imagine Award. Me? Creative? Imagine! What a compliment. Donna has fibromyalgia, but that isn’t what her blog is about. What isn’t her blog about? Politics, books, movies, TV shows, wonderful rants and interesting images. It is never laborious and always surprising. She has about 10 times the number of followers I do, if that tells you anything.

Jenn at My Fibrotastic Life nominated me for the “I Am Part Of The WordPress Family” award, which I’d never heard of, but the sentiment is wonderful and I truly appreciate the shout out. Jenn has fibromyalgia, but blogs about so much more. She has an Arts and Crafts Gallery, she has an online store to sell her creations, and her blog is upbeat with amusing photos and creative cartoons (she is, after all, the inventor of the Imagine Award). But don’t be fooled, she is also wonderfully honest about the evils of her illness.

Canary In A Coal Mine film needs our help!


Please watch this amazing video (you’ll be inspired, I swear – there are cameos by Dr. Enlander and Dr. Klimas), share the link and support the project, if you can. There’s only 27 days to go. Help this film get made to raise awareness about ME/CFS. Even $1 will help!

Also, you can share your own stories (“whether you are a canary or a spoonie”) here.


Stay tuned, I have partially written blog posts on the following topics and I aim to finish them sometime in the next few years ;):

  • Thoughts on 2 years sick (Sickiversary and 3rd Year Resolutions)
  • A prequel and sequel to my “How I Got Sick” story, which I never actually finished
  • Tilt table test and other autonmic testing
  • Mast cell disorders and low-histamine diet
  • Update my surgery post to include mastocytosis society’s guidelines
  • Allergies and sensitivities: drugs, food, dogs, dust, smells, life
  • My new environmental doctor and all the testing that’s going to cost me a fortune
  • HR, BP, circulation, and new symptoms in my hands and feet
  • How to start moving again
  • Dysautonomia
  • My scooter
  • Update on symptoms, diet and supplements
  • Photo slideshow of my crazy life
  • “Visible Illness”
  • Everything I’ve learned about helping sleep (not that it’s helping)
  • Recent NY Times articles
  • Dr. Vallings (my mother attended her talk in Ireland)
  • Dr. Chia and Dr. Kogelnick: thoughts on traveling to a specialist
  • Book reviews: Dr. Vallings, Dr. Bested, Bruce Campbell, Dr. Teitelbaum, Toni Bernhard, Dr. Blum (Immune System Recovery Plan), Dr. Turk (Pain Survival Guide)